Tag Archive for Experiments

Quest for mm-Wave Capability: Teardown, Analysis & Experiments on Generation & Detection

In this episode Shahriar demonstrates the effort for collecting affordable components and instruments in the past year to be able to generate mm-wave frequencies in the lab. The main goal is to generate synthesized CW signals beyond 26.5GHz and to be able to analyze them on the Keysight MXA Spectrum Analyzer.

Several instruments and components are which include the HP 83752B Synthesized Sweeper, HP 83556A mm-Wave Source Modules between 26.5-40GHz and 40-60GHz using doubler and trippler architectures, HP 8349B 2.0-20GHz amplifier, HP 11970 series harmonic mixers and OML DPL313B diplexer. Combining all these instruments along with various waveguide to coax converters mm-wave generation and detection is successfully demonstrated.

Finally, a full teardown of the mm-wave source module is presented which includes the preamplifier as well the waveguide module with very interesting design architecture.

Teardown, Repair and Analysis of an Agilent 8449B 1.0 – 26.5GHz Microwave Preamplifier

In this episode Shahriar analyzes the failure of two Agilent 8449B Preamplifiers. These units should provide up to 30dBm of gain from 1.0GHz to 26.5GHz intended for use as a preamplifier. Both amplifiers test positive for power supply voltages and operation. After removing the interface cables from the amplifier module to the front panel, it becomes clear that mechanical shock has caused damage to the front panel connectors. Replacement cables and connectors are used to correct the problem.

Tutorial, Experiment & Teardown of a 24GHz Doppler Radar Module

In this episode Shahriar demonstrates a full analysis of a CDM324 24GHz Doppler radar module from IC Station. Opening the module reveals a series of microwave PCB components and several active devices. A complete analysis of the module is presented. The unit is then measured and the impact of antenna impedance and power supply voltage on the output frequency is measured. The phase noise of the output signal is also measured. Using a series of servo motors, the radiation pattern of the antenna array in both azimuth and elevation is also presented.

Using the radar module the speed of a computer fan is remotely measure using an oscilloscope and FFT function.

All proceedings from Patreon for this video will be donated.

Signal Hound PNCS-1 1GHz Phase Noise Clock Standard Review, Teardown & Experiments

In this episode Shahriar takes a close look at the new Signal Hound PNCS-1 clock standard module. The purpose of this instrument is to provide an exceptionally clean phase noise reference at 1GHz in order to characterize other instruments such as spectrum analyzers and oscilloscopes.

The unit uses an OCXO at its heart running at 100MHz. The signal is them multiplied by a factor two and then a factor of five while being filtered and amplified in order to generate 1GHz. The complete signal path of the instrument is analyzed. The unit is then used on an Agilent MXA generator to characterize its phase noise. A frequency divider is also used in conjunction with the PNCS-1 in order to create lower frequency signals.

Teardown, Repair and Experiments with an Agilent E4981A High-Speed Capacitance Meter

In this episode Shahriar investigates an Agilent E4981A high-speed capacitance meter which fails self-test during startup. The instrument reports a series of errors associated with the CPU board. The teardown reveals a multi-board construction where the main analog assembly employs an FPGA for control and interface to the main CPU board. The unit has a disconnected ribbon cable between the analog board and the main CPU assembly. After correcting the problem the instrument completes self-test without errors.

After the repair the unit is used to measure several known capacitors for functionality verification. Finally the instrument is used to measure a hand-made parallel plate capacitor. The capacitor can accept various types of dielectric material whose impact is studied.

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