Archive for Tutorial

Noise & Performance Considerations of the DPH3205 Buck-Boost DC/DC Converter Module

In this episode Shahriar investigates the noise generated from the DPH3205 Buck-Boost DC/DC Converter Module. This module is part of a family of affordable devices which can be purchased online. The particular model (DPH3205) shown in this video can be purchased from here. The Keysight S-Scope in conjunction with the N7020 power probe is used to measure the noise behavior of the circuit. It can be observed that the module produces many harmonics of noise spanning up to and beyond 1MHz.

A power operational amplifier is used in conjunction with a 4V Zener diode to produce a crude voltage follower. The PSRR of the operational amplifier can filter the noise from the DC/DC converter. This is verified by measuring the noise coming from the operational amplifier. The noise is significantly reduced. This circuit is not entirely practical and is used for demonstration purposes only.

Tutorial, Teardown & Experiments with Stanford Research SR530 Lock-in Amplifier

In this episode Shahriar goes over the operation and principle theory behind Lock-in Amplifiers. The SRS SR530 is one of the most iconic lock-in amplifiers ever made and since it offers two channels it can be used to perform very interesting experiments across many domains. After reviewing the block diagram and equations governing the theory of operation, a brief instrument teardown is presented.

Two unique and interesting experiments are also presented. In the first experiment the instrument is used to measure the speed of light. This is accomplished by measuring the wavelength of sound at 20kHz using a pair of speakers and a function generator. The distance between the speakers can be carefully adjusted and the relative signal strength from each lock-in channel is measured and thus the wavelength can also be measured.

In the second experiment the sensitivity of a red LED to blue laser light is measured. Due to the semiconductor composition of the red LED as well as its red plastic casing, the responsibility of the LED to blue light is extremely low. A chopper is therefore used to lock the light to the lock-in amplifier’s reference input. The measured induced current is measured down to very low optical level in the order of hundreds of fempto (10^-15) amps.

Tutorial, Experiments & Teardown of a 77GHz Automotive FMCW Radar Module

In this episode Shahriar explores the principle operation of automotive FMCW radars. Thanks to a donated automotive radar module, various components of the system can be examined and explored. The PCB reveals three die-on-PCB ASICs responsible for generating and receiving 77GHz FMCW signals coupled to a 2D array of antennas. Several microwave components such as rat-race couplers and branchline couplers can also be observed. PCB rulers from SV1AFN Design Lab also show these microwave components at much lower frequencies. Two other ICs are used for ramp generation and PLL as well as a multi-input LNA/PGA/AAF with 12-bit ADC for IF processing. All components are examined under the microscope and the frequency of operation is calculated by measuring the branchline coupler’s dimensions.

Finally a simple Doppler effect radar is constructed by using a doubler, power divider, mixer and a pair of Vivaldi horn antennas. The Doppler effect can be observed by moving an object in front of the antenna pair.

Teardown & Analysis of an Agilent 86109B Optical/Electrical DCA-X Oscilloscope Module

In this episode Shahriar presents the inner workings of an Agilent 86109B optical/electrical DCA-X oscilloscope module. This particular model offers up to 50GHz of electrical bandwidth and an optical input capable of receiving up to 40Gb/s data rates. The differences between a real-time and sub-sampling oscilloscopes are presented with focus on ADC resolution, signal periodicity requirements and input bandwidth. The block diagram of the module as well as a sub-sampling oscilloscope is also presented.

The teardown of the module shows various components such as samplers, O/E conversion block, impulse generator as well as a step-recovery diode driver. I/O interfaces as well as various analog blocks are also shown. Several modules are further disassembled to observe the inner semiconductor designs under the microscope.

Tutorial on High-Power Balanced & Doherty Microwave Amplifiers

In this episode Shahriar demonstrates the architecture and design considerations for high-power microwave amplifiers. Two architectures are presented, the balanced and Doherty microwave amplifiers. The block diagram, circuit properties and the pros/cons of each architecture are presented. Two available high-power amplifiers modules for cellular applications are also examined. The PCBs show an implementation instance of each amplifier type capable of delivering 100W of RF power. The datasheet of various components as well as an overall system structure are also presented.

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