Archive for October 29, 2017

Dino-Lite USB Digital Microscopes Review and Experiments (2017 Edition)

In this episode Shahriar demonstrates a series of new Dino-Lite USB Digital Microscopes released in 2017. Several models are shown:

  • AM7515MT8A – This unit offers 700X-950X magnification with built in coaxial lighting as we as switchable bright-field and dark-field lighting options.
  • AM73915MZT – USB 3.0 interface with one touch auto-focus, EDOF & AMR. The unit also offers up to 45FPS in lower resolution mode. The magnification range is 20X – 220X.
  • AM73115MTF – USB 3.0 with Dino-Lite’s longest working distance at 1X – 70X magnification. Capable of 20X at 10.5” working distance and 70X at 4.5” working distance.
  • AM5218MZT – HDMI/DVI output connections, new edge optics, minimal latency with fast frame rate up to 60FPS in good lighting conditions.

Furthermore the Vision M1 automated platform is also presented which can be used to manipulate the XYZ position of any microscope through a PC USB connection. All other presented accessories can be found on Dino-Lite website.

The above models are used to analyze several microwave amplifier modules and components. The ASIC die of a 30GS/s Track & Hold Amplifier (THA) as well an RGB light sensors are also closely examined.

 

Teardown, Repair & Analysis of an Agilent E4443A 3Hz – 6.7GHz PSA Series Spectrum Analyzer

In this episode Shahriar repairs an Agilent PSA Series Spectrum Analyzer. The instrument generates many errors during self-alignment and produces no measurements below 3.2GHz. The block diagram of the unit is thoroughly presented and various possible failure points are considered. Based on the observation of the noise floor, the most likely cause is the second LO module. The measurement of the LO power indicates that the second LO power is fall below nominal.

The second LO signal (at 3.6GHz) is generated by a DRO PLL module which is locked to 600MHz. The PLL is functional, however the output power is below -20dBm. Teardown of the module reveals a simple design with a doubler and filter. The filter (which is discolored) shows a huge loss likely caused by RF losses due to trace degradation. Thinning the traces provides some improvement and the remaining loss is compensated with a two stage RF amplifier. With this modifications, the instrument’s alignment errors are partially resolved.

The next problem is with the input attenuator at the 20dB range. This problem is simply resolved by providing lubrication on the attenuator solenoids after disassembly. The instrument is then used for various measurements to verify its correct operation.

Noise & Performance Considerations of the DPH3205 Buck-Boost DC/DC Converter Module

In this episode Shahriar investigates the noise generated from the DPH3205 Buck-Boost DC/DC Converter Module. This module is part of a family of affordable devices which can be purchased online. The particular model (DPH3205) shown in this video can be purchased from here. The Keysight S-Scope in conjunction with the N7020 power probe is used to measure the noise behavior of the circuit. It can be observed that the module produces many harmonics of noise spanning up to and beyond 1MHz.

A power operational amplifier is used in conjunction with a 4V Zener diode to produce a crude voltage follower. The PSRR of the operational amplifier can filter the noise from the DC/DC converter. This is verified by measuring the noise coming from the operational amplifier. The noise is significantly reduced. This circuit is not entirely practical and is used for demonstration purposes only.

Teardown & Experiments with an Anritsu MS9710B 0.6-1.75um Optical Spectrum Analyzer

In this episode Shahriar repairs an Anritsu MS9710B Optical Spectrum Analyzer. The instrument intermittently does not boot and when it does it generates a Grating Mirror error. Some investigation reveals that the problems may simply be poor internal cabling connections which can be resolved by cleaning all connectors and re-building the unit. The LCD screen’s CCFL have also failed. An LED back-light replacement provides the screen with a vibrant and bright colors.

The unit is very compact (which is unusual for an Optical Spectrum Analyzer) and makes it ideal for bench-top working environments. The broad-spectrum built-in reference laser can be used to calibrate and align the instrument which proves to work perfectly. After calibration, a laser diode from an Agilent Lightwave Transmitter is measured. Interestingly it can be seen that the unit produces two tones at ~1nm apart which indicates the laser operates in two modes. A very interesting result given that the wavelength meter only reports one tone at the average wavelength of the two modes.

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