Teardown and Repair of a Fluke 196B Handheld ScopeMeter

Fluke_196B

In this episode Shahriar goes through the teardown and repair process of a Fluke 196B Handheld ScopeMeter. This unit, which has been purchased as a “dead” unit from eBay, is examined for faults. During the teardown, various PCB components, architecture and design is presented. The performance and functionality of the unit is verified with a few brief experiments. Finally, the schematic and block diagram of the Fluke 196B is explored for the finer details of its design and operation.

9 comments

  1. Kevin says:

    Great video, just to add the PSU is analogue and I believe any ‘close’ voltage will do. My PSU was faulty and a purchased a new one from fluke which @ over £100 and it was extremely noisy, I then purchased a switching supply which worked great, but you can’t use at the same time as doing sensitive low level measurements due to the injected PSU noise. So beware.

  2. Bill says:

    Shahriar,

    Indeed, what a great video. Best thumbs up to you on that one! I happen to own this model and hoping for a bit of advice from you as to what could be the problem. When I turn the unit “on” the screen only flashes off/on with nothing displayed and beeps with each flash. When I do plug in the supplied transformer with the unit “OFF” I hear the regulator/relay in the unit clicking back and forth. If I turn the unit “ON” in this mode, the relay does stop clicking and back to the flashing blank screen with beeps with each flash of the screen. I verified the battery is charging when transformer is plugged in.

    Sincerely,
    Bill

  3. Engineering.Mty says:

    Hello,
    Awesome video.
    I was hopeful you can help me. I have a 199C 200Mhz Fluke Oscilloscope.
    It was working fine but suddenly it seems like it got stuck on the reset screen.
    I turn it on and the screen works just fine, but when I hit any button nothing happens. So I can’t display menus at all. F keys don’t work either.
    On the screen input A seems to be enabled but, I can’t change any input options since the buttons don’t seem to work.

    Have you encounter this issue before?

    Thank you for your help.

    Best.

  4. Tess Trabucco says:

    Most important thing to be kept in mind when working with soldering iron is not to touch the tip of the iron as it is extremely hot. Soldering material used for the purpose is an alloy of tin and lead and is called flux. Before you put solder over the required area, heat up the surface to be soldered by touching the tip of the hot iron. Application of the solder is called “tinning”since percentage of tin is more in the flux. However, flux can be of various types depending upon the things to be soldered. ^

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  5. Matijs says:

    Hi Shariar,

    First of all I’d like to say that I really like your video’s!

    I just wanted to share a little trick with you.
    In the repair you cut away the diode. What I usually do is use a standard soldering iron and use a large drop of soldering tin on the tip.
    and use the blob of solder to heat up all the pins of the small package. and when desoldered it usually holds in the tin on the tip of the soldering iron. It mostly works just fine :). I’ve removed quite some smd components from some tight places this way.

  6. Shahriar,

    As it happens I have a Fluke 199B Scopemeter on loan (see http://sigrok.org/wiki/Fluke_ScopeMeter_199B). I’m noticing the same display flickering as you saw, so I guess that’s normal.

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